it happened in a burger king bathroom

For a very long time, I was absolutely certain I did not want children. I had thought it all out, see. I was not the mothering type. I wanted to spend my money on myself. I wanted to travel and have nice things. I proclaimed this loudly and often to anyone who would listen, and I took great pains to get offended when people would kind of shake their heads and say, “You’ll change your mind,” in response.

I was so mellow back then.

And then I entered this period of great ambivalence about childbearing, which I didn’t share with many people. I wasn’t really sure. Maybe I’d have kids. But I definitely did not want to date someone who already had kids. I’d heard horror stories of what a minefield it was to be a stepparent, and I just didn’t even want to deal with that kind of baggage. I wanted a man unspoiled by life, other women, and offspring.

Silly old mellow me.

So now here I am. I’m in love with the man I intend to marry someday, a man who loves me back and intends to marry me too. Weddings are always best when both spouses-to-be agree to show up, right? So I’m in love with this man – this amazing, intelligent, supportive, divorced father of two. Somehow I’m pretty sure he’s still unspoiled.

We waited several months into our relationship before I met the kids. Their stability is really important to both of us, and we wanted to be sure we were serious and in it for the long haul before we introduced them into our lives as a couple. So for the first few months we were dating, he went on his own to see them and I stayed home. When we began making plans for them to spend the first weekend with us, I was terrified.

I wanted desperately to like them and to have them like me back, but I knew there was a very good chance that they might not like me at all. They might even hate me at first, which would be fairly normal and probably not even about me as a person at all, and more about me as their dad’s new girlfriend. I tried to prepare myself for the possibility of a chilly reception and I hoped and hoped we’d have a good time.

And we did. I wrote about it in the spring. We had our moments of awkward tiptoeing and figuring each other out, but no one seemed to hate me and things were fine. I, of course, fell in love with them immediately. We had a couple of other visits and things continued to go pretty well, and I continued to fall in love. And I knew they liked me, and we had fun, but I didn’t know if they loved me and I didn’t expect them to. I’m not their mama, after all. I’m just The Other.

It’s become a little tradition that when we take the kids back after visits, we stop at Burger King. Seth and I have a thing for Mocha Joes and the kids can hit the Playland and it’s a convenient location. Plus it boosts our mood just a little, because though we never let the kids see, we’re always both a little mopey when we’re taking the kids back. So we stop at BK and the first thing we do, of course, is hit the bathroom.

Mira, age 5, likes to make small talk in public restrooms. One time we were at IHOP and I was waiting outside her stall for her to finish and from her perch on the toilet, she described to me in anatomically correct detail how babies were made. It’s always unpredictable and entertaining and sometimes embarrassing.

So we’re in the bathroom at Burger King and I’m waiting for Mira and she says, “Hey Lorie, you know what?” I’m kind of only halfway paying attention and I kind of absently say, “What, Mira?” and she says, “Did you know I love you?”

I’m almost certain it’s not the first time she told me that, but I think it’s the first time it came out of the blue and it’s definitely the moment I will always remember. It’s not terribly poignant, my little sorta step-girl on the toilet with her feet dangling down telling me she loves me, but ohh. My heart grows a little bit just in the retelling. She doesn’t have to love me, but she does.

It took me a second to respond that I loved her too, of course I did. She finished and we washed her hands and went out to join the rest of the family and the whole time, all I was thinking is, I want to be a mom. I want to be a mom. I want to be a mom.

Comments 10

  • Like. When people date for quality of the person as opposed to say money, material stability, or status, then the kids end up noticing. Kids don’t have money, stability or status so they don’t evaluate it in my book. They just see someone who cares or doesn’t. Kids will keep it real for you.

  • /whisper/campaign report/end whisper/.

    CACKLE CACKLE.

  • Lorie, you do realize this will become a book someday right? Cause lots of young families, and parents bringing two sets of children together will need some of the insight and thinkiness you bring to the matter. Good stuff.

  • I’m having kind of a rough day and this really lifted my spirits. Hooray for love in all it’s forms!

  • Awwww! AND, your title reminded me of “The Humpty Dance.” For the record.

  • Sounds like you already are. Lucky kids. :)

  • Awwww! Not to get all cheesy, but being a Mom is…well, there really are no words for it. It completely transforms you in the best way possible. I also used to say I would never have kids, but boy am I glad I was wrong. I’m glad you’ve found three someones who make you so happy!

  • I totally teared up while reading this. As a stepmom and a biomom, I can say without a doubt that being a stepmom is infinetly harder, but the rewards are too much for words. I have a few stories, too, that I keep in my back pocket for when the times are hard. And being a stepmom really solidified my desire to be a biological parent. I love being both and as hard as it gets, would never ever change our life. Yay for you and your family :)

  • I read this again the other day and it’s just so good. And great to hear. And cool.

    I do hope to read more of your stuff again soon.

  • Are you out of the burger king bathroom yet?

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